Exploring the fluid dynamics of collective pulsing behaviour in xeniid corals using the immersed boundary method

9 Jul 2018, 16:30
30m
New Law School---106 (University of Sydney)

New Law School---106

University of Sydney

100
Oral Presentation Minisymposium: From solitary swimmers to coordinated groups: modelling motion in fluids at very low Reynolds number From solitary swimmers to coordinated groups: Modelling motion in fluids at very low Reynolds number

Speaker

Julia Samson (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Description

Xeniid corals, a family of soft corals (Alcyonacea), include species displaying a unique pulsing behaviour. Within a colony, each individual polyp pulses by actively contracting and passively expanding eight tentacles, increasing the local mixing and enhancing nutrient and gas exchange. Using the immersed boundary method with finite elements (IBFE), we constructed a 3D model of a pulsing polyp. The motion of the polyp tentacles is based on actual motion data tracked from videos of real polyps. We find that individual polyps pull water in radially, mix it between their tentacles, and expel the fluid volume in an upward jet. After validating this 3D IBFE model against experimentally measured flow fields, we are now using the model to numerically simulate small groups of polyps and to quantify the effects of collective pulsing behaviour on the local fluid dynamics. Here, we simulate pairs of polyps and vary the pulsing patterns (in-phase and different degrees of out-of-phase) and distance between polyps to better understand how differences in collective pulsing behaviour affect local flow and mixing.

Primary authors

Julia Samson (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Dr Laura Miller (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Presentation Materials

There are no materials yet.
Your browser is out of date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now

×